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Bound I - Tom and Garth, 2006Bound II - Tom and Garth, 2006Bound III - Xin and Sean, 2007Bound IV - d.k. Pan, 2007Bound V - Jacob and Michael, 2007
Bound VI - Jamison, 2007Bound VII - Paul and David, 2007Bound VIII - Dave, 2007Bound IX - John, 2007Bound X - Jeffry, 2007
Bound XI - George, 2007Bound XII - Boris, 2007Bound XIII - Yann, 2007Bound XIV - Renato, 2007Bound XV - Joel, 2007
Bound I - Tom and Garth, 2006
Bound I - Tom and Garth, 2006
Bound II - Tom and Garth, 2006
Bound II - Tom and Garth, 2006
Bound III - Xin and Sean, 2007
Bound III - Xin and Sean, 2007
Bound IV - d.k. Pan, 2007
Bound IV - d.k. Pan, 2007
Bound V - Jacob and Michael, 2007
Bound V - Jacob and Michael, 2007
Bound VI - Jamison, 2007
Bound VI - Jamison, 2007
Bound VII - Paul and David, 2007
Bound VII - Paul and David, 2007
Bound VIII - Dave, 2007
Bound VIII - Dave, 2007
Bound IX - John, 2007
Bound IX - John, 2007
Bound X - Jeffry, 2007
Bound X - Jeffry, 2007
Bound XI - George, 2007
Bound XI - George, 2007
Bound XII - Boris, 2007
Bound XII - Boris, 2007
Bound XIII - Yann, 2007
Bound XIII - Yann, 2007
Bound XIV - Renato, 2007
Bound XIV - Renato, 2007
Bound XV - Joel, 2007
Bound XV - Joel, 2007
Bound

In Bound, rope symbolizes the mental, physical and spiritual ties that bind. Materially, the subjects are bound to self, others, and inseparably the unknown. The tied ropes are constricting or loose, a representation of the various connections and disconnections between friends, lovers and strangers. Ropes around the subjects' heads act as a metaphor for how we're wrapped up inside our perceptions and simultaneously, by emphasizing yet obscuring the face, the viewer is encouraged to consider other aspects of the body.

In many respects this work is informed by the theatrical, but here the darkened stage is replaced by utter blackness. The series aims to plot emotional points between figures that stand effortlessly in the void to those that are contorted in space. Some subjects appear completely at ease with those existential limits - their environment cradles them. Others seem to struggle with their conflicting fate. It raises the question: How comfortable are we when supported by the knowledge that, while some things are indeed know-able, the unknown remains both tangible and inevitable?
bound