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Wild Boys I and II, 2006The Prophet, 2012The Initiate, 2012The Place of Dead Roads, 2013Blood Oath, 2012
Consumption, 2012Drawing Down the Old Gods, 2012The Wanderer, 2013Searching for Clues, 2006The Only Good Fink is a Dead Fink, 2012
Red Fever, 2012
Wild Boys I and II, 2006
Wild Boys I and II, 2006
The Prophet, 2012
The Prophet, 2012
The Initiate, 2012
The Initiate, 2012
The Place of Dead Roads, 2013
The Place of Dead Roads, 2013
Blood Oath, 2012
Blood Oath, 2012
Consumption, 2012
Consumption, 2012
Drawing Down the Old Gods, 2012
Drawing Down the Old Gods, 2012
The Wanderer, 2013
The Wanderer, 2013
Searching for Clues, 2006
Searching for Clues, 2006
The Only Good Fink is a Dead Fink, 2012
The Only Good Fink is a Dead Fink, 2012
Red Fever, 2012
Red Fever, 2012

Wild Boys

Jose Esteban Munoz, in Cruising Utopia, writes “Queerness is essentially about the rejection of a here and now and an insistence on potentiality or concrete possibility for another world.”

Wild Boys exists in an alternate universe that, while actively hostile, is a place where queers have agency. The tribalism, rituals, and anachronistic imagery throughout the work have their basis in texts by William S. Burroughs, Jean Genet, and Hakim Bey. In this imperfect Utopia, intimate acts frequently transcend space and time and sometimes lead to death. These metaphors reference not only the stories of my youth but the current world we live in; a place where queerness is still “other” and must be defended if we are to do more than survive.

Wild Boys exists in this universe to open a narrow gap in a mechanized society, granting my peers a ritualized space to be fully alive and engaged, and to give a glimpse to outside viewers what always exists on a subconscious level. The narrative can only be understood in part, each image its own scene from a book still being written sometime in the past and somewhere in the future. 

wild boys